NPR News

Pages

Law
2:14 pm
Mon June 3, 2013

Supreme Court Rules DNA Can Be Taken After Arrest

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled Monday in a case that looked at whether police could take DNA samples from people who had been arrested but not yet convicted of a crime.
Alex Brandon AP

Originally published on Mon June 3, 2013 4:53 pm

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled Monday that police can routinely take DNA samples from people who are arrested but not yet convicted of a crime, and see if the DNA matches any samples from unsolved crimes in a national database.

The 5-to-4 decision split the court's conservative and liberal blocs, with conservative Justice Antonin Scalia authoring a fiery dissent. Twenty-eight states and the federal government have enacted laws that provide for automatic DNA testing of arrestees.

Read more
It's All Politics
1:50 pm
Mon June 3, 2013

5 Things You May Not Know About Sen. Frank Lautenberg

Sen. Frank Lautenberg speaks to members of the press in January.
Alex Wong Getty Images

Originally published on Mon June 3, 2013 4:53 pm

New Jersey Sen. Frank Lautenberg wasn't a regular on the Sunday talk shows. He never ran for president or cut much of a national profile.

Still, the liberal Democrat, New Jersey's longest-serving senator, left his mark as a legislator on a wide range of issues, from transportation to public health to the environment.

Read more
Author Interviews
1:48 pm
Mon June 3, 2013

Hello Muddah, Hello Drama: The Brief Bloom Of Parodist Allan Sherman

Allan Sherman released three albums between October 1962 and August 1963.
Courtesy Robert Sherman

Originally published on Mon June 3, 2013 4:53 pm

The summertime novelty tune "Hello Muddah, Hello Fadduh" has been pouring out of radios for 50 years now. In late July of 1963, Billboard magazine reported that fans were "actually breaking down doors" of record stores to buy the song about the pains of summer camp.

Read more
The Two-Way
1:20 pm
Mon June 3, 2013

Wildfire North Of Los Angeles Is 40 Percent Contained Monday

Sparks fly from a burning hollowed tree in the area of the Powerhouse fire near Lake Hughes, Calif., Sunday.
David McNew Getty Images

Originally published on Mon June 3, 2013 7:11 pm

Firefighters were able to double containment of the huge Powerhouse wildfire north of Los Angeles to 40 percent Monday, as cooler weather helped them against the blaze that has scorched more than 45 square miles. No deaths have been reported as a result of the fire, which caused some 1,000 homes to be evacuated.

Update at 9 p.m. ET. Some Evacuations Lifted; Name Explained:

Read more
The Salt
1:04 pm
Mon June 3, 2013

Grass: It's What's For Dinner (3.5 Million Years Ago)

Some 3.5 million years ago, our ancestors put grass on the menu.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon June 3, 2013 1:49 pm

If you could travel back in time about 8 million years, you'd find a creature in an African tree that was the ancestor of all current apes and humans. And that creature in all likelihood would have spent a big part of its day munching leaves and fruit — pretty much what apes eat now.

Read more
The Two-Way
12:41 pm
Mon June 3, 2013

Why Chase Tornadoes? To Save Lives, Not To 'Die Ourselves'

Friday's storm, which produced a mile-wide tornado, as it neared El Reno, Okla.
Richard Rowe Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Tue June 4, 2013 6:10 am

  • Josh Wurman on why scientists get close to tornadoes
  • Josh Wurman on how the community is reacting to three storm chasers' deaths

The deaths Friday of veteran storm chaser Tim Samaras, his son Paul and their friend Carl Young when a tornado near El Reno, Okla., pummeled their vehicle has raised some questions:

-- Why do storm chasers do what they do?

-- Do the benefits outweigh the dangers?

Read more
The Salt
12:08 pm
Mon June 3, 2013

Sandwich Monday: Dunkin' Donuts Glazed Donut Breakfast Sandwich

We couldn't wait for Dunkin's Glazed Donut Breakfast Sandwich to go national, so we got the raw materials and made our own.
NPR

Originally published on Mon June 3, 2013 12:09 pm

Like all great traditional Boston foods — the Boston Cream Pie, Boston Baked Beans, the Chicago Pizza at the Pizzeria Uno near Fenway — the Glazed Donut Breakfast Sandwich is about to go national. Someday, Bostonians will talk about how they heard it play when it was just a cool, local sandwich.

Ian: I never realized how pointless bagels were before.

Miles: I like a breakfast that forces me to take a nap right after waking up.

Read more
The Salt
12:07 pm
Mon June 3, 2013

Wal-Mart Pledges Fresher Produce By Cutting Out The Middleman

A shopper selects produce at a Wal-Mart in Deptford, N.J.
Matt Rourke AP

Originally published on Tue June 4, 2013 2:02 pm

The nation's largest retailer announced Monday that it will be delivering produce from farms to stores faster by buying fruits and vegetables directly from growers.

The plan is to source about 80 percent of fresh produce directly, explained Jack Sinclair, executive vice president of the food business for Wal-Mart U.S., during a conference call that we participated in Monday morning.

In many instances, Sinclair says it will be possible to "cut out the middleman," but he added that local wholesalers will continue to "play an important role for us in the areas we serve."

Read more
It's All Politics
12:05 pm
Mon June 3, 2013

Lautenberg's Death Sets Off New Jersey Senate Scramble

Sen. Frank Lautenberg, D-N.J., died Monday at age 89. He had announced in February that he would not seek re-election in 2014.
Manuel Balce Ceneta AP

Originally published on Mon June 3, 2013 12:09 pm

The traditionally collegial U.S. Senate was never a natural fit for Frank Lautenberg, the wealthy New Jersey businessman whose headstrong, CEO style could rankle.

But the five-term senator, who died early Monday at age 89, managed to serve as a passionate and able advocate for a tight collection of causes, from gun control and public health to Israel and mass transit.

Read more
Parallels
11:53 am
Mon June 3, 2013

Calls For Justice For Tiananmen Met With Silence

For 24 years, Ding Zilin has sought justice for the death of her 17-year-old son, Jiang Jielian, on June 3, the night before Chinese authorities cracked down on protesters in Beijing's Tiananmen Square. Now, the 76-year-old despairs that she will die before she is allowed to mourn her son on the spot where he was killed. She stands in front of a small shrine to her son in her Beijing home.
Louisa Lim NPR

Originally published on Mon June 3, 2013 6:31 pm

Ding Zilin has spent the past 24 years on one mission: seeking justice for the death of her son, 17-year-old Jiang Jielian, who was shot in the back by Chinese soldiers on the night of June 3, 1989.

This year, her mood is one of black despair.

"It's possible that before I leave this world, I won't see justice," the frail 76-year-old told me. We're sitting in the living room of her Beijing home, near a shrine to her son that includes a wooden cabinet holding his ashes.

Read more

Pages